Milou | From barista to illustration artist

By Eleni Meraki

They used to tell me not to dream, that’s when I decided to make all my dreams come true.

INTRODUCING MILOU 

 

From an early age my parents realised I was not cut out for school. As a child I was always collecting pictures, making my own artworks. I finished high school but going to uni was not right for my personality. I‘ve had every job you can imagine; from selling Indian pants to barista. It was only through the encouragement of friends, family and lucky coincidence that I found my dream career.


5 THINGS ABOUT

 

NEVER FINISHED ART SCHOOL  |  COFFEE LOVER  |  SELF-TAUGHT PROFESSIONAL  |  INTUITION OVER RATIONAL  |  DOG LOVER

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LEAP OF FAITH

 

One Christmas I was exceptionally broke so I decided to make personalised paintings as Christmas presents for my friends and family. They were a hit and I started drawing and painting more and more. One day a gallery owner walked into the cafe where I was working at the time and where some of my work was hanging. A couple of weeks later was my first exhibition at a club in Amsterdam. Then on my 25th birthday, Elle magazine called - they wanted to use one of my paintings for an article. That’s how it all started. Just by getting myself out there.


MILOU NEELEN - WHATEVER MEETS THE EYE

I believe that everything in my career happened the way it was supposed to. I don’t regret anything.
 

I started my own company, where I work as an independent print artist and illustrator. I work with different clients on lots of different types of projects from fashion magazines (ELLE), to wall paintings in stores, logo's (Milou created ours!) to patterns and the list goes on... The variation is what I love and keeps my work fresh.

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GETTING STARTED

Dropping out of school, selling Indian pants, being a barista, it all led me to where I am now. Looking back, I wouldn’t do it any differently.
 

After a few expositions of my work, I created an online portfolio. An agent came across my work and asked me if I was interested in a full-time job at a fashion brand. Working for a commercial company was a great learning experience to develop my skills and confidence and then make the step into freelancing.  


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THE TOUGH TIMES

Be open and honest with your clients and always be yourself. Don’t pretend or overpromise.
 
  • Planning. Work and life merge very quickly. At one point I was working 24/7. You have to make conscious decisions about your work hours.

  • The art of saying "no". When you start working for yourself you want to get as much work in as possible. Some of the work I was doing was not creatively stimulating but just got me money to live. It's tough to say no when you have no financial stability, but you have to do work that represents the kind of professional you want to become.

  • Finances. Have some savings hidden away, it's is a good way to feel more secure while navigating the freelance ocean.  And having an accountant! Very important and absolutely worth the money.

FINANCIALS

 

True to the 'starving artist' cliche, I started with nothing. In fact, I had just enough money to pay my rent at the end of the month. When I made the decision to start freelancing full-time and quit my job, I had saved 3 months of rent as a buffer. 

I got an accountant early on, that really helped me sort out my administration. There are lots of tools out there to help you as a freelancer, like an online test to estimate your hourly rate based on the number of clients and the hours you wanted to work. That was really helpful. 

My goal is always to have enough in savings to last me 3 months without any money coming in.


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5 INSIDER TIPS

 
  1. Follow your instinct. Don’t over-rationalise important decisions.

  2. Only advertise or share the work you want to do again.

  3. Freelancing can be lonely; working in a studio with other creative/freelancers is a good option and worth the investment.

  4. Working for a big commercial company is a fantastic learning experience before going solo.

  5. Make solid agreements with clients (planning, revision rounds etc.) and stick to them.

GET IN TOUCH WITH MILOU

WEBSITE   INSTAGRAM   PINTEREST


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Eleni Meraki.jpg
 

Written by Eleni Meraki

Eleni is the founder of Guts & Tales. She lives in Athens and enjoys roaming the world as much as she can. She is a multi-passionate entrepreneur with big dreams and a big mission; to empower you to live a life you truly enjoy living.
Click on the About Eleni tab to read her full story.